Roman Catholicism

Church distinguishes between vice, which is a habit inclining one to sin, and the sin itself, which is an individual morally wrong act. Note that in Roman Catholicism, the word “sin” also refers to the state that befalls one upon committing a morally wrong act. In this section, the word always means the sinful act. It is the sin, and not the vice, that deprives one of God’s sanctifying grace and renders one deserving of God’s punishment.Thomas Aquinas taught that “absolutely speaking, the sin surpasses the vice in wickedness”. 7] On the other hand, even after a person’s sins have been forgiven, the underlying habit (the vice) may remain. Just as vice was created in the first place by repeatedly yielding to the temptation to sin, so vice may be removed only by repeatedly resisting temptation and performing virtuous acts; the more entrenched the vice, the more time and effort needed to remove it.Saint Thomas Aquinas says that following rehabilitation and the acquisition of virtues, the vice does not persist as a habit, but rather as a mere disposition, and one that is in the process of being eliminated. Medieval illuminated manuscripts circulated with colorful schemas for developing proper attitudes, with scriptural allusions modelled on nature: the tree of virtues as blossoming flowers or vices bearing sterile fruit, The Renaissance writer Pietro Bembo is credited with reaffirming and promoting the Christian perfection of classical humanism.Deriving all from love (or the lack thereof) his [8]schemas were added as supplements[9] in the newly-invented technology of printing by Aldus Manutius in his editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy dating from early in the 16th century. Dante’s seven deadly vices[edit] The poet Dante Alighieri listed the following seven deadly vices, associating them structurally[10] as flaws in the soul’s inherent capacity for goodness as made in the Divine Image yet perverted by the Fall: 1.Pride or vanity: an excessive love of the self (holding the self outside of its proper position regarding God or fellows; Dante’s definition was “love of self perverted to hatred and contempt for one’s neighbor”). In the Latin lists of the Seven Deadly Sins, pride is referred to as superbia. 2. Enw or Jealousy: resentment of others for their possessions (Dante: “love of one’s own good perverted to a desire to deprive other men of theirs”). In the Latin lists of the Seven Deadly Sins, enw is referred to as invidia. 3.Wrath or anger: feelings of hatred, revenge or denial, as well as punitive desires outside of Justice (Dante’s description was “love of Justice perverted to revenge and spite”). In the Latin lists of the Seven Deadly Sins, wrath is referred to as ira, which primitive vices tempt astray by increasingly perverting the proper purpose of charity, directing it inwards, leading o a disorded navel-gazing preoccupation with personal goods in isolation absent proper harmonious relations leading to violent disruption of balance with others. . Sloth or laziness: idleness and wastefulness of time or other allotted resources. Laziness is condemned because it results in others having to work harder; also, useful work will not be done. Sloth is referred to in Latin as accidie or acedia, which vice tempts a self-aware soul to be too easily satisfied, thwarting charity’s purpose as with the needs of others and their satisfaction, an escalation in evil, more odious han the passion of hate 5.Avarice (covetousness, greed): a desire to possess more than one has need or use for (or according to Dante, “excessive love of money and power”). In the Latin lists of the Seven Deadly Sins, avarice is referred to as avaritia. 6. Gluttony: overindulgence in food, drink or intoxicants, or misplaced desire of food as a pleasure for its sensuality (“excessive love of pleasure” was Dante’s rendering). In the Latin lists of the Seven Deadly Sins, gluttony is referred to as gula. 7. Lust: excessive sexual desire. Dante’s criterion was that “lust detracts from true love”.In the Latin lists of the Seven Deadly Sins, lust is referred to as luxuria, which vices tempt cultivated souls in their ability to direct charity’s proper purpose to good things or actions, by indulging excess. Thus in Dante’s estimation the soul’s detachment from sensual appetites become the vices most difficult to tame, urges not as easily curbed by mere good manners since inflamed via appropriate use rather than inappropriate misuse. Hence conventional respect for the ninth and enth commandments against coveting and social customs that encourage custody of the eyes and ears become prudent adjuncts to training against vice.The first three terraces of purgatory expiate the sins which can be considered to arise from love perverted, that is, sins which arise from the heart of the sinner being set upon something which is wrong in the eyes of God. Those being purged here must have their love set upon the right path. The fourth terrace of purgatory expiates the sins which can be considered to arise from love defective, that is, love which, although irected towards the correct subjects is too weak to drive the sinner to act as they should.Those being purged here must have their love strengthened so as to drive them correctly. The fifth, sixth and seventh terraces of purgatory expiate the sins which can be considered to arise from love excessive, that is, love which although directed towards ends which God considers good is directed towards them too much for the sinner to gain bliss from them, and also so that the sinner is distracted from the love of other things of which God approves. Their love must be cooled to a more sensible level.

Information Systems Theories Assignment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays – 5000 words

Information Systems Theories Assignment – Essay Example

……………………………………………Page 7 Ethical Considerations In The Report……………………………………………..Page 7 CATWOE & Root Definition Analysis……………………………………………Page 8 Root Definition…………………………………………………………………………….Page 8 Findings………………………………………………………………………………………Page 8 Discussion…………………………………………………………………………………..Page 9 Sustaining IT Provision of Public Services………………………………………Page 10 Inventory Management………………………………………………………………….Page 10 Capacity Decisions & Work Scheduling………………………………………….Page 11 Quality………………………………………………………………………………………..Page 12 HM Government Operational Performance………………………………………Page 12 Outsourced Logistics…………………………………………………………………….Page 13 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………..Page 14 References…………………………………………………………………
e of both the strategic and day-to-day operations of HM Government’s IT systems and how they influence the experiences of the British public (Porter, 2004, p.87). Various aspects of each British citizen’s experience with the government will greatly influence the general public’s perception of the quality of HM Government’s IT systems and the administrative programmes they represent. Therefore, in the current era of restless citizens, who may well take their ‘work’ to competing private contractors, there is an increased need for government representatives to be the British public’s advocates (Reynolds & Howell, 2010, p.142). HM Government’s IT systems therefore need to be influenced by many different angles and perspectives, with the closest consideration being given to the impact on HM Government’s perceived quality and equity in IT governance. Any reforms on the government systems must therefore be aimed at the satisfaction of the British public. The Soft Systems Methodology Report Analysis of House of Commons Public Administration Committee Report This Report, entitled “Recipes for rip-offs”, is highly critical of overall HM Government IT systems procurement, implementation and support strategy. The Committee is thoroughly justified in stating that HM Government pays a lot (and by implication, far too much) for IT, as compared to the commercial sphere. The Committee recommends that these problems may be corrected through the following measures. First, the information view that HM Government has of it’s IT systems in general must be dramatically improved. This problem is due to the inadequate data that HM Government has available to it for the benchmarking of available IT products and services. It is therefore evident that HM Government pays

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